Weekly Photo Challenge: Containers

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I love this photo challenge. It makes me think of my daughter. I think of children as containers – containers of mass quantities of energy.

My daughter is naturally hyper and can go, go, go from the moment she gets up until several hours after she’s been put to bed – yes, you read that correctly. She lays in bed most nights, talking to herself, or singing, or telling such creative stories to her stuffed animals she’s gone to bed with.

I have also added cups (containers that hold important liquids, such as coffee).

Have a blessed day!

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One Word Photo Challenge: Rainbow

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I love rainbows. Just something about a bow of bright colors magically appearing high in the sky after a storm. It stands out in its unique way across a dark blue sky, causing almost everyone to notice it. They make me smile and feel like a giddy child as I think back to stories from my childhood of the pot-o-gold at the end of the rainbow or the one about Noah and the Ark.
Here are a few pictures I have taken of some rainbows. Enjoy! And may you have a blessed day! :-)
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For anyone wishing to partake in the photo challenge, or to see next weeks challenge, please check out this blog: http://jennifernicholewells.com/2014/07/15/one-word-photo-challenge-rainbow/

Cats, Kittehs, and Kittens

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All photos were taken by me and are copyrighted by me. Please do not use them without my consent.

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All photos were taken by me and are copyrighted by me. Please do not use them without my consent.

There is no such thing as an Autistic Adult

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JennNAdams:

As a mother of an autistic daughter, I worry about when she won’t have the assistance she will need when she becomes of age. I can see that my worrying isn’t all for not, after reading what this blogger has gone through in her search for assistance as an adult with autism.

Originally posted on Pensive Aspie:

Autism only occurs in children.  Because it is a childhood disorder, as an autistic child leaves adolescence behind, the symptoms of their autism will gradually decrease and disappear. By the time the person is an adult, they will be completely Autism-free. They will have no need for speech or physical therapy. No need for mental health services. They will be fully functioning adults – ready to get a job, go to college and begin their new life without autism.

Notme!

Of course this is ABSOLUTELY, 100% NOT TRUE, but this is something I am told every day by the media and organizations that claim to “support Autism.”

When I first suspected I had Asperger’s, I immediately began looking for more information about a diagnosis and support. A google search of Autism and Jacksonville, FL was hopeful. So many resources! CARD (Center for Autism and Related Disabilities). The HEAL (Healing Every Autistic…

View original 936 more words

Driving lessons from my 4 year old.

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My daughter makes the best back seat driver.

I’ll be driving through town, obeying the speed limits, she’ll blurt out, “Go fast mommy, go faster!” I simply tell her, “I can’t or the police will get onto mommy.”

Or if I’m stopped at a red light, she’ll tell me, “Go mommy, go, go, go!” I then tell her, “That light is telling me that I must stop. If I go, then I’ll crash into another car.”

Finally I instructed her on the rules of driving: Red light means stop, green light means go, and by all means, Mommy cannot drive as fast as you want her to in town or we’ll get stopped by the police. She tells me okay, but it took a few tries for her to understand it. After all, she is a toddler, always on the go, can’t sit still for more than five minutes.

When we come up to the traffic lights now, she’ll yell out what color the light is and what it means, correctly. They when we merge onto the interstate, she’ll tell me to go faster, but I’ll still obey the speed limits and traffic laws.

I’m so glad she’s only four and won’t be driving for quite some time.

 

 

Homemade Starbucks Mocha Frap Recipe

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found on google images

This morning I decided to buy the Starbucks Mocha drink mix while I was out shopping at my local grocery store. The price for the drink mix is about the same price for just one of their medium sized drinks, so why not save money and make my own at home.

When I got home I noticed it didn’t have any recipes on the carton, nor any websites for the buyer to go to find homemade recipes using their mix. I spent twenty minutes searching the net for a good recipe when I kept coming up on the same homemade recipe that everyone is using that didn’t ask for the mocha mix. Instead, they asked for you to brew a cup of coffee, add several cups of milk, a cup of ice, 3/4 cup of sugar (REALLY?? That’s a lot of sugar for just one cup of coffee), then add chocolate syrup or cocoa powder. Hmm, so not what I was looking for. I then decided to just make up my own recipe, though with the help of the Oregon Chai recipe (found on their website, as well as on the side of their cartons).

I did go to one of the few Starbucks websites looking for recipes, but found one of their websites that looked more or less like a training site for their employees. Their main page just shows what’s on their menu and you can also shop for coffee or buy one of their coffee machines. I guess their recipes are Top Secret or they would rather you spend your money on having one of their employees making you one from their store.

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found on google images

 

I have a NutriBullet blender, which is for smoothies, but when I make fraps they come out foamy, rather than creamy. Here’s the recipe that I have tried so far:

1 cup of ice

1/2 cup of the coffee mix

1 cup of milk

1 teaspoon of cocoa powder

1 1/2 teaspoons of sugar

If you have a better recipe, please leave it in the comments below.

When It Storms

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Sometimes it’s hard to be the adult when you’re a parent. I like to act more childish than my daughter at times, though that’s only around her. I enjoy making her laugh, it lightens my heart.

These past few days we’ve been enduring thunderstorms. My daughter is frightened of the thunder…most children are. Every time there’s a loud noise or something that scares her, she’ll run into the hallway. There she finds it safe, probably because there aren’t any windows and it seems more closed in.

When I was growing up we moved around a lot; most of those places were in tornado alley. Every time we had a thunderstorm or tornado warnings and/or watches, my youngest two sisters and I would find shelter under the kitchen table. This was honestly the safest place we could find in our tiny house. We actually turned our kitchen table into a fort. We would turn the chairs around so that the backs would be right up against the table. Then we would hang blankets over the back of the chairs, then place pillows around the back of the chair legs. We made it comfortable and dark, though we always made sure to bring a handful of flashlights with us, as well as books and snacks. Meanwhile, our mother would be in the living room, listening to the weather on the TV, to which we could hear from where we were, under the table. We would stay under there until the storm went away.

That was twenty-five years ago, give or take a year or two, when my sisters and I made our thunderstorm fort. Lately when a thunderstorm comes through, my daughter and I would sit on the couch together, far from the window. I would watch TV, while she would have her headphones on, playing with her Kindle. Yesterday she kept complaining about the thunder. It rumbled so loud, it made the house shake. And each time it would thunder, she would dart off into the hallway. She finally just hung out there for awhile. She looked sad and depressed, not to mention she left her kindle on the couch, so she was also bored. I decided to join her, but with toys, pillows, her kindle, her portable DVD player, and some blankets. I made us a little pad, partially in the hallway, where we stayed until the storms left our area.

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